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Snow, Deep Freeze Grip Eastern U.S. This Week

UPDATED 1 PM EST, January 22, 2014

UPDATED By WeatherBug Meteorologist, Fred Allen and James West

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A major winter storm has not only left the Mid-Atlantic and southern New England digging out of more than a foot of snow, it is also unleashing January`s second dangerous deep freeze in the past two weeks.

Strengthening low pressure well east of the Delmarva Peninsula will rocket into the Canadian Maritimes today and will bring some lingering snow to Rhode Island, Cape Cod, Nantucket and Martha`s Vineyard through this afternoon. Another 2 to 4 inches of snow will be possible here.

Although travelling via highways, byways and airways will improve this morning, the snow early today across eastern Massachusetts will push accumulations in spots above 18 inches. South Weymouth, Mass., is the jackpot so far, with 15.5 inches of new snow since Tuesday. Little Ferry, N.J., is digging out of 13.4 inches of fluffy snow, with East Rutherford, N.J., picking up 13 inches. Even the western suburbs of Baltimore and Washington measured a band of 6 to 10 inches.

An extreme dip in the jet stream is unleashing another arctic blast in the storm`s wake. Northerly and northwesterly winds are sending temperatures into the single digits and teens as far south as the Southeast, with upper 20s reaching all the way to the Gulf Coast this morning.

Further north from the Midwest into the Mid-Atlantic, the mercury has dropped 20 to 30 degrees since the same time yesterday, with minus-20s to minus-30 degrees below zero readings found in northern New England, stretching across the Great Lakes, eastern Plains, Ohio Valley, Mid-Atlantic and Northeast.

On top of the dangerously cold temperatures, a fresh deep snow pack and gusty winds are culminating in wind chills ranging from around minus-40 degrees in northern New England, to the single digits and teens below zero reaching as far south as the North Carolina and northeastern Georgia mountains this morning.

Scattered Wind Chill Advisories and Wind Chill Warnings are in place from Maine into northern Georgia, with other Wind Chill Advisories in place from the Dakotas to Arkansas, as well as from southern Georgia into central Florida, including Pensacola and Orlando. Temperatures this low could not only lead to hypothermia or frostbite in as little as 10 minutes if skin is left exposed, it will also threaten or kill sensitive crops and vegetation across the Deep South and Florida.

Unfortunately, winter won`t be unlocked in the Eastern U.S. anytime soon as a series of Alberta Clippers continue to carve a reinforcing dip in the jet stream through the end of the workweek. That will mean temperatures will reach as much as 10 to 15 degrees below normal as far south as Florida. The clippers will also trigger blizzard conditions across the Upper Midwest as winds gust to 40 mph there.

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