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More Midwest Storms Leave 3 Dead, 2 Still Missing

May 31, 2013

By The Associated Press

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Large hail and more tornadoes could strafe parts of Oklahoma, Arkansas and Missouri again, a day after powerful storms and floods killed at least three people in the storm-weary region.

Up to a dozen tornadoes touched down in mostly rural parts of Arkansas on Thursday, as well as one in Illinois and three in Oklahoma. One twister bounced through the Tulsa suburb of Broken Arrow, causing some structural damage, but no injuries.

State police said there were "confirmed fatalities" in western Arkansas where a game warden and sheriff went missing in flooding overnight. Police spokesman Bill Sadler would not say how many bodies were found in Y City, or if the warden and sheriff were among those found. Y City is about 125 miles west of Little Rock.

Heavy winds caused a tree to topple onto a car in Tull, about 30 miles southwest of Little Rock, late Thursday, killing the driver, the Grant County Sheriff's Office said.

Nine people were reported injured.

The National Weather Service was sending teams to survey the aftermath of Thursday's storms in Arkansas. Warning coordination meteorologist in Little Rock, John Robinson, said it could take days for the weather service to confirm whether tornadoes struck as flooded highways was hindering access to the storm-hit areas. Flooding was also a concern in parts of Missouri, Iowa and Illinois through Sunday.

Thursday's tornadoes all appeared to be much less dangerous than the top-of-the-scale EF5 storm that struck Moore, Okla., on May 20 and killed 24 along its 17-mile path. The U.S. averages more than 1,200 tornadoes a year, but EF5 storms like the one in Moore - with winds over 200 mph - happen only about once per year. The tornado last week was the nation's first EF5 since 2011.

This spring's tornado season got a late start, with unusually cool weather keeping funnel clouds at bay until mid-May. The season usually starts in March and then ramps up for the next couple of months.

Of the 60 EF5 tornadoes since 1950, Oklahoma and Alabama have been struck the most, seven times each. More than half of these top-of-the-scale twisters have occurred in just five states: Alabama, Iowa, Kansas, Oklahoma and Texas.

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Associated Press writers Ken Miller in Oklahoma City, Jeannie Nuss in Little Rock, Ark., and Seth Borenstein in Washington contributed to this report.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.

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Story image: Lightning strikes as a thunderstorm moves across US-36 highway near White Cloud, Kan. AP Photo/Orlin Wagner

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