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When Is The Best Time To Travel To The Caribbean?

June 21, 2011

By WeatherBug's Paul Miller

The Caribbean has long been a favorite destination for vacationers. Every year hundreds of thousands of sightseers flock to the white, sandy shores and enchanted rainforests of these tropical oases. With spring-breakers packing the beaches during the peak travel season, and hurricanes coinciding with off-season prices, the question frequently asked is, "When is the best time to go to the Caribbean?"

The Caribbean climate is truly delightful all year long. In 'winter,' highs routinely climb into the upper 70s and low 80s while low temperatures rarely fall below 65 degrees. When the U.S. is sulking in the snow, Caribbean isles are soaking in the sun with 80 degree temperatures. Summer carries a much different meaning as well. While average temperatures increase from June to September, highs still only peak in the upper 80s.

Although sunshine often dominates the Caribbean sky, the islands` lush vegetation is only made possible by regular rainfall. While daily showers and thunderstorms are typical in tropical climates, generally, the Caribbean islands experience fewer rainy days from January to June than from July to December. Not all islands are moisture-rich, however. Aruba, Bonaire, and Curacao actually possess dry, rain-free climates.

Despite its Eden-like appeal, the Caribbean is not without hazards. Heavy showers and thunderstorms frequently pop-up out of nowhere putting all plans on hold for a few hours. These bouts of thunder, however, are no comparison to the ferocity of a tropical cyclone. Hurricane season officially lasts from June 1 to November 30 each year and typically peaks between mid-August and mid-October. These devastating forces of nature can quickly cancel all vacation plans or force an early departure.

Luckily, certain parts of the Caribbean are spared from the fury of landfalls. Historically, most impacts occur north of Grenada and west of Barbados. Islands such as Aruba, Bonaire, and Trinidad and Tobago lie outside of 'Hurricane Alley' and often prove to be cyclone-free destinations.

Weather isn`t the only factor in vacation planning. With the annual tourist season occurring during winter and spring, many hotels and resorts offer discounted rates during the summer and fall. However, landing a lower price won`t necessarily place you in the path of a hurricane. Countless Caribbean tourism companies offer travel insurance year-round as a precaution against many types of weather-related disruptions as well as a variety of other risks.

That still leaves one question unanswered, "When is the best time to go to the Caribbean?" And the answer is, it's always a great time to visit the Caribbean! Such a tropical paradise can rarely be passed up at any time of the year. Hazards and prices may vary seasonally, but the allure of the Caribbean never wavers. While we may go on vacations to escape the stresses of work and home, the Caribbean never takes a break from offering an unforgettable get-away!

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